Author Deborah Davis

Deborah is a Speaker, Disability Inclusion Consultant, Entrepreneur, Writer and Business Owner of Wheelchair Lifestyle Enterprise Push Living Inc. She was a Former Dancer, Accident Survivor (C 6-7 Spinal Cord Injury resulting in incomplete Quadriplegia 1985), College grad (BBA Finance 1991 U of Miami), with a background in Sales and Marketing and Non Profit Development and Management. She is now embarked on new path creating a market for Disability Inclusive Stock Images with the creation of PUSHlivingPhotos.com and publishing an online enterprise: PushLiving.com. The mission is to create Inclusion for people with disabilities through stock images for advertising, marketing and editorial uses, providing accessible properties for travel, swap or purchase, publishing an online magazine for improved health and well-being, providing information and opportunities for Accessible Travel, and operating an online store with products that improve lives. She is most passionate about building a network of people with disabilities who are empowering, supporting and creating a more inclusive world. Personally, she is a mother of two beautiful, wise and exceptionally bright young women, and residing in South Florida.

Design & Access Model Wafula
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Being Seen: The Long Road Toward Inclusion

When I started college at the University of Miami in 1985, Student Disability Services had never before accommodated someone in a wheelchair. There were no accessible rooms or campus facilities. The bathrooms barely fit my chair and I couldn’t close the door behind me. In fact, I had to roll from classes all the way back to my dorm room to use the bathroom.

Lifestyle
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How to Train a Service Dog: Part One—Finding your Match!

I was contemplating making a move to a big city, but found myself feeling overwhelmed and unsafe due to the strangers who kept approaching me. As both a woman and a wheelchair user, I felt particularly vulnerable (“sitting duck’ was a term someone so generously offered) and I knew it was only a matter of time before someone saw an opportunity to use my situation to their advantage, or simply cause me to feel uncomfortable due to inappropriate social contact.

Inspiration woman on a wheelchair talking to a man
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The Kindness of Strangers

We have all been in the position where a kind word, a helpful gesture or a simple pleasantry can make all the difference in how we feel in the moment, or result in a memory that changes us for a lifetime.

Magazine
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Einstein

‘I am thankful to all those who said no. It’s because of them, I did it myself.’ Einstein (Also Attributed…

Inspiration Cortney in pink wheelchair posing with front wheel on a skateboard
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“When You Roll with Life, You Know People will be Watching” An Interview with Cutie Courtney Cirabasi

Okay, so no way around it. When you’ve got a wheelchair and you go in public, people are going to look. They’re going to pay attention to you, and they do ask questions or make comments sometimes. When you roll with life, you know people will be watching. I’ve grown used to it, and in a weird way, embracing who I am in the chaos of the attention some people give, it has helped me become very confident.

Design & Access Casey, a young man with blonde hair in wheelchair with a young girl posing next to him outside in the sun with his black labrador
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Voices of the Community: Bogus Service Dogs – The Scam Co-Opting the Rights of the Disabled

To some people, this may not seem like a big deal. What’s the problem with being allowed to bring one of your best friends with you everywhere? Unfortunately, it’s a huge problem. Every legitimate service animal has been evaluated, and will continue to be evaluated to make sure that it is suitable to be out in public where you may experience large crowds, loud noises, and a huge list of distractions. A lot of average pets can be easily scared by many of those things, which can also mean aggression and violent behavior. That is not safe at all for the public, and especially not safe for service animals.

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